•  
  •  
 
Nano Research

Article Title

Direct detection and measurement of wall shear stress using a filamentous bio-nanoparticle

Authors

Daniela P. Lobo, Department of Chemistry and Warwick Analytical Science Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
Alan M. Wemyss, Department of Chemistry and Warwick Analytical Science Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK MOAC Doctoral Training Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
David J. Smith, Mathematics, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT, UK
Anne Straube, Centre for Mechanochemical Cell Biology, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
Kai B. Betteridge, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK
Andrew H. J. Salmon, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK
Rebecca R. Foster, Clinical Sciences, Whitson Street, University of Bristol, Bristol BS1 3NY, UK
Hesham E. Elhegni, Clinical Sciences, Whitson Street, University of Bristol, Bristol BS1 3NY, UK
Simon C. Satchell, Clinical Sciences, Whitson Street, University of Bristol, Bristol BS1 3NY, UK
Haydn A. Little, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT, UK
Raúl Pacheco-Gómez, Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT, UK
Mark J. Simmons, Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT, UK
Matthew R. Hicks, Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT, UK
David O. Bates, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham NG2 7UH, UK
Alison Rodger, Department of Chemistry and Warwick Analytical Science Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
Timothy R. Dafforn, Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT, UK
Kenton P. Arkill, Biochemistry, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK

Keywords

microfluidics, nanoparticle, M13 bacteriophage, wall shear stress, fluorescent microscopy

Abstract

The wall shear stress (WSS) that a moving fluid exerts on a surface affects many processes including those relating to vascular function. WSS plays an important role in normal physiology (e.g. angiogenesis) and affects the microvasculature’s primary function of molecular transport. Points of fluctuating WSS show abnormalities in a number of diseases; however, there is no established technique for measuring WSS directly in physiological systems. All current methods rely on estimates obtained from measured velocity gradients in bulk flow data. In this work, we report a nanosensor that candirectly measure WSS in microfluidic chambers with sub-micron spatial resolution by using a specific type of virus, the bacteriophage M13, which has been fluorescently labeled and anchored to a surface. It is demonstrated that the nanosensor can be calibrated and adapted for biological tissue, revealing WSS in micro-domains of cells that cannot be calculated accurately from bulk flow measurements. This method lends itself to a platform applicable to many applications in biology and microfluidics.

Graphical Abstract

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

Share

COinS