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Nano Research

Article Title

Crystal-plane-dependent redox reaction on Cu surfaces

Authors

Yangsheng Li, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Hao Chen, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Weijia Wang, School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210, China
Wugen Huang, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Yanxiao Ning, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China
Qingfei Liu, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Yi Cui, Vacuum Interconnected Nanotech Workstation, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123, China
Yong Han, School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210, China
Zhi Liu, School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210, China State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, China
Fan Yang, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210, China
Xinhe Bao, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China

Keywords

in situ STM, NAP-XPS, surface oxide, Cu(111), Cu(110)

Abstract

The dynamic redox process of surface oxide layers on metal surfaces is of great significance for understanding the active phase in catalytic reactions. We studied the formation of surface oxide layers on Cu(111) and Cu(110) in O2, as well as the subsequent reduction by CO using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By monitoring and comparing the oxidation process of Cu(111) and Cu(110) surfaces, we found a crystal-plane-dependent reaction mechanism, which also applies to the reduction of surface oxide layers on Cu surfaces. We found XPS Cu spectra cannot be used to identify the various surface oxide layer on Cu surfaces, suggesting their presence in catalytic reactions might have been overlooked. The combination of STM and XPS studies are thus advantageous in identifying surface oxide structures and pinpointing the active phases in the redox process, which paves the way for engineering the catalyst and reaction environment for optimized catalytic performances.

Graphical Abstract

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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