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Nano Research

Article Title

All VN-graphene architecture derived self-powered wearable sensors for ultrasensitive health monitoring

Authors

Lianghao Yu, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Yuyang Yi, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Ting Yao, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Yingze Song, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Yiran Chen, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Qiucheng Li, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Zhou Xia, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Nan Wei, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Zhengnan Tian, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Baoqing Nie, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Li Zhang, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Zhongfan Liu, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China Center for Nanochemistry (CNC), Beijing Science and Engineering Center for Nanocarbons, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
Jingyu Sun, College of Energy, Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials Innovations (SIEMIS), Key Laboratory of Advanced Carbon Materials and Wearable Energy Technologies of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China

Keywords

VN-graphene architecture, solid-state supercapacitor, pressure sensor, self-powered wearable sensor, health monitoring

Abstract

The booming of wearable electronics has nourished the progress on developing multifunctional energy storage systems with versatile flexibility, which enable the continuous and steady power supply even under various deformed states. In this sense, the synergy of flexible energy and electronic devices to construct integrative wearable microsystems is meaningful but remains quite challenging by far. Herein, we devise an innovative supercapacitor/sensor integrative wearable device that is based upon our designed vanadium nitride-graphene (VN-G) architectures. Flexible quasi-solid-state VN-G supercapacitor with ultralight and binder-free features deliver a specific capacitance of ~ 53 F·g−1 with good cycle stability. On the other hand, VN-G derived pressure sensors fabricated throughout a spray-printing process also manifest favorably high sensitivity (40 kPa−1 at the range of 2–10 kPa), fast response time (~ 130 ms), perfect skin conformability, and outstanding stability under static and dynamic pressure conditions. In turn, their complementary unity into a self-powered wearable sensor enables the precise detection of physiological motions ranging from pulse rate to phonetic recognition, holding promise for in-practical health monitoring applications.

Graphical Abstract

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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