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Nano Research

Article Title

A theranostic agent for cancer therapy and imaging in the second near-infrared window

Authors

Zhuoran Ma, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Hao Wan, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Weizhi Wang, CAS Key Laboratory of Standardization and Measurement for Nanotechnology, CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing 100190, China
Xiaodong Zhang, Department of Physics and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Sciences, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350, China
Takaaki Uno, JSR Corporation Advanced Materials Research Laboratories, 100 Kawajiri-Cho, Yokkaichi, Mie 5108552, Japan
Qianglai Yang, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055, China
Jingying Yue, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Hongpeng Gao, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Yeteng Zhong, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Ye Tian, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Qinchao Sun, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Yongye Liang, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055, China
Hongjie Dai, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

Keywords

theranostic nanoparticles, second near-infrared window, fluorescence imaging, cancer therapy

Abstract

Theranostic nanoparticles are integrated systems useful for simultaneous diagnosis and imaging guided delivery of therapeutic drugs, with wide ranging potential applications in the clinic. Here we developed a theranostic nanoparticle (~ 24 nm size by dynamic light scattering) p-FE-PTX-FA based on polymeric micelle encapsulating an organic dye (FE) fluorescing in the 1,000–1,700 nm second near-infrared (NIR-II) window and an anti-cancer drug paclitaxel. Folic acid (FA) was conjugated to the nanoparticles to afford specific binding to molecular folate receptors on murine breast cancer 4T1 tumor cells. In vivo, the nanoparticles accumulated in 4T1 tumor through both passive and active targeting effect. Under an 808 nm laser excitation, fluorescence detection above 1,300 nm afforded a large Stokes shift, allowing targeted molecular imaging tumor with high signal to background ratios, reaching a high tumor to normal tissue signal ratio (T/NT) of (20.0  2.3). Further, 4T1 tumors on mice were completed eradicated by paclitaxel released from p-FE-PTA-FA within 20 days of the first injection. Pharmacokinetics and histology studies indicated p-FE-PTX-FA had no obvious toxic side effects to major organs. This represented the first NIR-II theranostic agent developed.

Graphical Abstract

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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