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Nano Research

Article Title

Engineering subcellular-patterned biointerfaces to regulate the surface wetting of multicellular spheroids

Authors

Luying Wang, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Pingqiang Cai, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
Jing Luo, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Feilong Zhang, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Jian Liu, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
Yupeng Chen, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Zhongpeng Zhu, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Yongyang Song, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Bingquan Yang, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
Xi Liu, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Xiaodong Chen, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
Shutao Wang, CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

Keywords

topography, wetting, multicellular spheroids, cell adhesion, collective migration, biointerfaces

Abstract

ABSTRACT Studying the wetting behaviors of multicellular spheroids is crucial in the fields of embryo implantation, cancer propagation, and tissue repair. Existing strategies for controlling the wetting of multicellular spheroids mainly focus on surface chemistry and substrate rigidity. Although topography is another important feature in the biological micro-environment, its effect on multicellular spheroid wetting has seldom been explored. In this study, the influence of topography on the surface wetting of multicellular spheroids was investigated using subcellularpatterned opal films with controllable colloidal particle diameters (from 200 to 1,500 nm). The wetting of hepatoma carcinoma cellular (Hep G2) spheroids was impaired on opal films compared with that on flat substrates, and the wetting rate decreased as colloidal particle diameter increased. The decrement reached 48.5% when the colloidal particle diameter was 1,500 nm. The subcellular-patterned topography in opal films drastically reduced the cellular mobility in precursor films, especially the frontier cells in the leading edge. The frontier cells failed to form mature focal adhesions and stress fibers on micro-patterned opal films. This was due to gaps between colloidal particles leaving adhesion vacancies, causing weak cell–substrate adhesion and consequent retarded migration of Hep G2 spheroids. Our study manifests the inhibiting effects of subcellular-patterned topography on the wetting behaviors of multicellular spheroids, providing new insight into tissue wetting-associated treatments and biomaterial design.

Graphical Abstract

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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