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Journal of Advanced Ceramics

Authors

Xiaoyu JI, Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China;South China Advanced Institute for Soft Matter Science and Technology, School of Molecular Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
Yiruo ZHANG, South China Advanced Institute for Soft Matter Science and Technology, School of Molecular Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
Mengxue CAO, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University, New Haven 06511, USA
Quanchao GU, Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China
Honglei WANG, Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China
Jinshan YU, Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China
Zi-Hao GUO, South China Advanced Institute for Soft Matter Science and Technology, School of Molecular Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
Xingui ZHOU, Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China

Keywords

solid-state electrolytes (SSEs), hybrid electrolytes, energy density, electrical energy storage (EES), lithium batteries

Abstract

Solid-state batteries have become a frontrunner in humankind’s pursuit of safe and stable energy storage systems with high energy and power density. Electrolyte materials, currently, seem to be the Achilles’ heel of solid-state batteries due to the slow kinetics and poor interfacial wetting. Combining the merits of solid inorganic electrolytes (SIEs) and solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs), inorganic/polymer hybrid electrolytes (IPHEs) integrate improved ionic conductivity, great interfacial compatibility, wide electrochemical stability window, and high mechanical toughness and flexibility in one material, having become a sought-after pathway to high-performance all-solid-state lithium batteries. Herein, we present a comprehensive overview of recent progress in IPHEs, including the awareness of ion migration fundamentals, advanced architectural design for better electrochemical performance, and a perspective on unconquered challenges and potential research directions. This review is expected to provide a guidance for designing IPHEs for next-generation lithium batteries, with special emphasis on developing high-voltage-tolerance polymer electrolytes to enable higher energy density and three-dimensional (3D) continuous ion transport highways to achieve faster charging and discharging.

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