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Friction

Authors

Weijun LI, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Hao LIU, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Yuanyuan MI, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Miaoran ZHANG, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Jinmiao SHI, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Ming ZHAO, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Melvin A. RAMOS, Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA
Travis Shihao HU, Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA
Jianxiong LI, Department of Orthopedics General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853, China
Meng XU, Department of Orthopedics General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853, China
Quan XU, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Laboratory of Biogas Upgrading Utilization, Harvard SEAS- CUPB Joint Laboratory on Petroleum Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China

Keywords

bionic mussel, hydrogel, waste potato residues, adhesion, conductivity

Abstract

There is a high demand for hydrogels with multifunctional performance (a combination of adhesive, mechanical, and electrical properties) in biological, tissue engineering, robotics, and smart device applications. However, a majority of existing hydrogels are relatively rigid and brittle, with limited stretchability; this hinders their application in the emerging field of flexible devices. In this study, cheap and abundant potato residues were used with polyacrylamide (PAM) to fabricate a multifunctional hydrogel, and chitosan was used for the design of a three-dimentional (3D) network-structured hydrogel. The as-prepared hydrogels exhibited excellent stretchability, with an extension exceeding 900% and a recovery degree of over 99%. Due to the combination of physical and chemical cross-linking properties and the introduction of dopamine, the designed hydrogel exhibits a remarkable self-healing ability (80% mechanical recovery in 2 h), high tensile strength (0.75 MPa), and ultra-stretchability (900%). The resultant products offer superior properties compared to those of previously reported tough and self- healing hydrogels for wound adhesion. Chitosan and potato residues were used as scaffold materials for the hydrogels with excellent mechanical properties. In addition, in vitro experiments show that these hydrogels feature excellent antibacterial properties, effectively hindering the reproduction of bacteria. Moreover, the ternary hydrogel can act as a strain sensor with high sensitivity and a gauge factor of 1.6. The proposed strategy is expected to serve as a reference for the development of green and recyclable conductive polymers to fabricate hydrogels. The proposed hydrogel can also act as a suitable strain sensor for bio-friendly devices such as smart wearable electronic devices and/or for health monitoring.

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

Included in

Tribology Commons

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