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Brain Science Advances

Authors

Fabin Han, The Institute for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng University/Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Shandong 252000, China The Translational Research Lab for Stem Cells and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250355, China
Chuanguo Liu, The Translational Research Lab for Stem Cells and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250355, China
Jin Huang, Key Laboratory of Tissue Repair and Regeneration of PLA and Beijing Key Research Laboratory of Skin Injury, Repair and Regeneration, The Fourth Medical Centre of PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China
Juanli Chen, The Institute for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng University/Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Shandong 252000, China
Chuanfei Wei, The Institute for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng University/Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Shandong 252000, China
Xiwen Geng, The Translational Research Lab for Stem Cells and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250355, China
Yanming Liu, The Institute for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng University/Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Shandong 252000, China
Dong Han, Shandong Molecular Diagnostics & Cell Therapeutic Biotechnology Corporation, Ji’nan, Shandong 250001, China
Mengpeng Li, The Institute for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng University/Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Shandong 252000, China

Keywords

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), amyloid-beta plaque (Aβ plaque), neural stem cell (NSC), transplantation, mutation

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disease which is mainly caused by aggregated protein plaques in degenerating neurons of the brain. These aggregated protein plaques are mainly consisting of amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) of phosphorylated tau protein. Even though the transgenic murine models can recapitulate some of the AD phenotypes, they are not the human cell models of AD. Recent breakthrough in somatic cell reprogramming made it available to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for patient- specific disease modeling and autologous transplantation therapy. Human iPSCs provide alternative ways to obtain specific human brain cells of AD patients to study the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for familial and sporadic forms of AD. After differentiation into neuronal cells, iPSCs have enabled the investigation of the complex aetiology and timescale over which AD develops in human brain. Here, we first go over the pathological process of and transgenic models of AD. Then we discuss the application of iPSC for disease model and cell transplantation. At last the challenges and future applications of iPSCs for AD will be summarized to propose cell-based approaches for the treatment of this devastating disorder.

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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