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Astrodynamics

Article Title

The deep-space multi-object orbit determination system and its application to Hayabusa2’s asteroid proximity operations

Authors

Hiroshi Takeuchi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama 240-0193, Japan
Kent Yoshikawa, Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Yuto Takei, Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Yusuke Oki, Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Shota Kikuchi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Hitoshi Ikeda, Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Stefania Soldini, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, UK
Naoko Ogawa, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Yuya Mimasu, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Go Ono, Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Fuyuto Terui, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Naoya Sakatani, Rikkyo University, Toshima-ku 171-8501, Japan
Manabu Yamada, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino 275-0016, Japan
Toru Kouyama, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koto-ku 135-0064, Japan
Shingo Kameda, Rikkyo University, Toshima-ku 171-8501, Japan
Takanao Saiki, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Yuichi Tsuda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama 240-0193, Japan

Keywords

orbit determination, optical navigation, gravity measurements, superior solar conjunction, delta differential one-way ranging (delta-DOR)

Abstract

The deep-space multi-object orbit determination system (DMOODS) and its application in the asteroid proximity operation of the Hayabusa2 mission are described. DMOODS was developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for the primary purpose of determining the trajectory of deep-space spacecraft for JAXA’s planetary missions. The weighted least-squares batch filter is used for the orbit estimator of DMOODS. The orbit estimator supports more than 10 data types, some of which are used for relative trajectory measurements between multiple space objects including natural satellites and small bodies. This system consists of a set of computer programs running on Linux-based consumer PCs on the ground, which are used for orbit determination and the generation of radiometric tracking data, such as delta differential one-way ranging and doppler tracking data. During the asteroid proximity phase of Hayabusa2, this system played an essential role in operations that had very strict navigation requirements or operations in which few optical data were obtained owing to special constraints on the spacecraft attitude or distance from the asteroid. One example is orbit determination during the solar conjunction phase, in which the navigation accuracy is degraded by the effect of the solar corona. The large range bias caused by the solar corona was accurately estimated with DMOODS by combining light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and ranging measurements in the superior solar conjunction phase of Hayabusa2. For the orbiting operations of target markers and the MINERVA-II2 rover, the simultaneous estimation of six trajectories of four artificial objects and a natural object was made by DMOODS. This type of simultaneous orbit determination of multi-artificial objects in deep-space has never been accomplished before.

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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