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Astrodynamics

Article Title

Hayabusa2’s station-keeping operation in the proximity of the asteroid Ryugu

Authors

Yuto Takei, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Takanao Saiki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Yukio Yamamoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Yuya Mimasu, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Hiroshi Takeuchi, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Hitoshi Ikeda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Naoko Ogawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Fuyuto Terui, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Go Ono, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Kent Yoshikawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Tadateru Takahashi, NEC Corporation, Fuchu 183-8501, Japan
Hirotaka Sawada, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Chikako Hirose, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Shota Kikuchi, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Atsushi Fujii, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Takahiro Iwata, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Satoru Nakazawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Masahiko Hayakawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Ryudo Tsukizaki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Satoshi Tanaka, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Masanori Matsushita, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Osamu Mori, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Daiki Koda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Takanobu Shimada, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Masanobu Ozaki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Masanao Abe, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Satoshi Hosoda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Tatsuaki Okada, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Hajime Yano, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan
Takaaki Kato, NEC Aerospace Systems, Ltd., Fuchu 183-8502, Japan
Seiji Yasuda, NEC Corporation, Fuchu 183-8501, Japan
Kota Matsushima, NEC Corporation, Fuchu 183-8501, Japan
Tetsuya Masuda, NEC Corporation, Fuchu 183-8501, Japan
Makoto Yoshikawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan;The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sagamihara 252-5210, Japan

Keywords

small body mission, station-keeping, guidance, navigation, and control (GNC), optical and radiometric navigation

Abstract

The Japanese interplanetary probe Hayabusa2 was launched on December 3, 2014 and the probe arrived at the vicinity of asteroid 162173 Ryugu on June 27, 2018. During its 1.4 years of asteroid proximity phase, the probe successfully accomplished numbers of record-breaking achievements including two touchdowns and one artificial cratering experiment, which are highly expected to have secured surface and subsurface samples from the asteroid inside its sample container for the first time in history. The Hayabusa2 spacecraft was designed not to orbit but to hover above the asteroid along the sub-Earth line. This orbital and geometrical configuration allows the spacecraft to utilize its high-gain antennas for telecommunication with the ground station on Earth while pointing its scientific observation and navigation sensors at the asteroid. This paper focuses on the regular station-keeping operation of Hayabusa2, which is called "home position" (HP)-keeping operation. First, together with the spacecraft design, an operation scheme called HP navigation (HPNAV), which includes a daily trajectory control and scientific observations as regular activities, is introduced. Following the description on the guidance, navigation, and control design as well as the framework of optical and radiometric navigation, the results of the HP-keeping operation including trajectory estimation and delta-V planning during the entire asteroid proximity phase are summarized and evaluated as a first report. Consequently, this paper states that the HP-keeping operation in the framework of HPNAV had succeeded without critical incidents, and the number of trajectory control delta-V was planned efficiently throughout the period.

Publisher

Tsinghua University Press

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